The Well-Being Journal

A Closer Look at Social Health Games with Trapper Markelz of MeYou Health: Part 2

Jennifer Rudloff

A Closer Look at Social Health Games with Trapper Markelz continued - click here for part 1)

Games can change the world.
With social being such an important piece of the puzzle, were also looking for ways to create a reason to be social. One of those very useful reasons to be social is through games.

The benefits of playing games are just recently being taken more serious, in part due to discussions and presentations from Jane McGonigal on how games can change the world.

Jane and others believe that games bring forth the best version of ourselves. It is a version that is cooperative, engaged, social, confident, and empowered. If games bring out our best behaviors - and behaviors spread across social networks - than in Jane’s world games make us “contagious vectors of awesome.” Meaning, we can truly have an impact on anything we want to accomplish in real life.

So we ask ourselves at MeYou Health... How can we take advantage of how games can help people achieve real results inside of a well-being product like Daily Challenge?

To be clear, using game concepts in Daily Challenge isn’t about making it into an actual game (where there is a winner and a loser); rather, it’s about utilizing the methods that game designers use to make participation, both individually and socially, as clear and effortless as possible.

To make this happen there needs to be clear dynamics that let me, as a user, know what I am suppose to do -- and when I am suppose to do it. There needs to be clear mechanics that let me know where I am starting, how I am progressing, when I am moving forward, when I am moving backwards or falling behind, how I compare to others who just started participating, and how much I can achieve if I stick with it. There also has to be clear aesthetics and feedback that make me feel the celebration moments, the encouragement, the support, the competition and completion. If we do all of these things correctly than I, the user, never feel lost. Instead, I always feel in control, I am continually surprised and delighted, and the entire experience in which I chose to participate is fulfilling to me on many levels.

In Daily Challenge, we are bringing all of these things together. We suggest a small, realistic thing for you to do in a convenient daily email. Then when you complete the small action, we provide immediate positive feedback within a game context, where sharing and being social is explicitly expected. It is the stories of doing these actions that become memorable. It is remembering the conversation, the celebration and the support that makes you aware of the next time you have the opportunity to make that small choice again. All of these dynamics -- the mechanics, prompts, actions, conversations, and aesthetics -- work together in Daily Challenge to create an engaging, fulfilling experience that helps improve well-being.

Social + games make for the best experiences.
MeYou Health uses game mechanics because they make a product social in far more ways than is possible without them. If you believe social at all matters for engagement and that engagement is important to have effect, then games are the way you will get there. For example: When you accomplish something in Daily Challenge, both big and small, you are awarded a stamp that serves a celebratory artifact and points that propel you towards reaching higher levels, respectively.

By utilizing a blend of social networking science, connectedness research, behaviorial-driven design and gamification, Daily Challenge is one of the more unique health products out there today. Daily Challenge is a social well-being product with nothing less than the ambition to inspire lasting, lifelong change for millions of people. We are well on our way. Join us at dailychallenge.com.

Topics: Healthy Living Engagement Health MeYou Health Natural Movement Playing Games Daily Challenge Connected: The Surprising Power of Social Networks Behavior Change Games for Behavior Change Social Well-Being Health Games

A Closer Look at Social Health Games with Trapper Markelz of MeYou Health: Part 1

Jennifer Rudloff

Playing games like Tag growing up was fun because these backyard games were social. We got to hang out with other kids. What a blast it was being part of a relay team or kicking the ball around at recess. Back then, movement was part of play (we didn’t really think much about it), and chances are our parents didn’t have to force us to go outside to race our bikes with the neighborhood kids.

Then we entered school and college and work... and our movement decreased as we grew up and became quote-unquote adults in the real world. We had to shift from the idea of play to the idea of work. Despite responsibilities of being an adult, play is still very much at the center of enjoying life. Which explains why we find fun ways to connect with others, whether it’s huddled around a game of Risk with friends, shooting hoops with our son or daughter in the driveway, or virtually teaming up with fellow gamers in World of Warcraft.

We are all connected.
The social connections we have as adults are just as important, if not more so, than the ones we had as kids. The connections we had as kids helped shape us. The ones we have as adults help sustain us.

In recent coverage by USA Today and Gail Sheehy, social interaction plays a key role in our well-being and happiness. So much so that women who spent one to five hours a day socially interacting - be it via Facebook, face-to-face, or by phone - had the highest well-being versus those who did not make social connectedness a daily priority. The key takeaway from Gail’s article and the data presented from Healthways is that the more closely we are in contact with our social connections, the better our happiness and health is. Makes sense, doesn’t it?

By making time for social interactions, we can experience a boost in our well-being. And that can have a significant impact on the health and wellness of our social networks.

There’s strength in networks.
At MeYou Health, we created Daily Challenge to be a social product that helps improve well-being through daily small actions. The goal has always been to promote new and deeper connections, creating support networks that drive meaningful change in our lives. The stronger these connections, the richer the experience. The richer the experience, the higher the commitment level.

The idea behind Daily Challenge is simple: do one small action at a time, each and every day. As we have learned through the work of Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler (best represented in their book Connected), we are all connected... and so are our behaviors. It turns out these connections run deeper than we realize, allowing our behaviors, both good and bad, to become influenced by people we might hardly know or possibly not know at all. Crazy but powerful stuff.

To study social networks and behavior change, MeYou Health is looking at both the social, mathematical and biological rules governing how social networks form (“connection”) and the biological and social implications of how they operate to influence feelings, thoughts, and behaviors (“contagion”).

With Daily Challenge, we can see for the first time how support networks are structured, along with what role high and low well-being play in their formation and influence. We are, in fact, building a one-of-a-kind map of well-being based on the information we have gathered since Daily Challenge’s launch in 2010. This information is leading to a whole set of controlled studies this year and clinically controlled studies next year to quantify the true effects of social mechanics on intervention engagement and improved well-being.

(Look for more in Part II)

Topics: Engagement Health MeYou Health Natural Movement Playing Games Daily Challenge Connected: The Surprising Power of Social Networks Behavior Change Games for Behavior Change Social Well-Being Health Games

Great Habits Make for Great Results!

Jennifer Rudloff

Woman eating healthyNow is the perfect time to reaffirm your commitment to your healthy diet and fitness goals.

Holiday festivities are just around the corner. This year, give yourself the gift of fitness! By planning ahead, you can avoid the weight gain, disappointment and (ever so common) Sprint & Fizzle of New Year's resolutions.

Sticking to an exercise & diet regime takes time, effort and commitment. Having support can make the difference between success and reverting back to old unhealthy habits. Finding a supportive friend, training partner, family member or online forum will go a long way towards helping you stay focused and motivated.

Staying fit is an ongoing lifestyle choice.

Here are some great suggestions that will lead to your success:

  • The simple act of READING about eating healthy and different ways to stay on track can make a big difference! You’ll subconsciously recall something you read and act upon even without realizing you are doing it.
  • The simple act of LOOKING at images that reflect your goals can make a big difference! Put a picture, article or motivational statement on your refrigerator door. Be sure it really inspires YOU. Look at it and think of what it means to you every time you think of opening the door or walk by.
  • Set realistic goals that can be met and maintained in the midst of day to day activities and responsibilities.
  • Let go of thinking in terms of ‘on’ or ‘off’ The Diet. Just be aware of what you eat & make good healthy, low calorie choices TODAY.
  • Limit portion size. 2 bowls taste the same as 2 bites. Pay attention to when you are ‘full’ and when you are eating it because it is there.
  • Limit soda and drink more water. Staying hydrated helps curb appetite.
  • Leave food on the stove. Fill your plate with less than you think you want and go sit down. You will be less likely to go back for more.
  • Balance your choices. Drop the ‘all or nothing’ thinking. If you treat yourself today, then make up for it by eating stricter and less calories tomorrow. Develop a healthy, guilt free relationship with food.
  • Don’t punish yourself or beat yourself up, but rather keep moving forward with your overall plan. The only way you will not get there is by standing still. Keep going!
  • Find ways to get exercise that you enjoy enough to do faithfully.
  • Do you 'stuff' your anger or eat to 'fill the void’ of boredom, loneliness or other emotions? Feel it, don’t eat it! Take action instead. Bored? Lonely? Go for a walk or call a friend.
  • Reward yourself! Every single day you are taking one step closer to your goal and practicing the habits that will help you maintain forever. Celebrate, acknowledge and enjoy!
  • Set yourself up to succeed! Maintain your desired weight and fitness level with an exercise and meal planning schedule that fits into your personal lifestyle.

By setting healthy lifestyle goals and reaching them, you will find joy, energy, self-confidence and new emotional coping tools that do not involve food.

Many people successfully attain and maintain their weight and fitness goals. You can, too!

Topics: Healthy Living Focus Exercise Motivation Social Well-Being Habits Diet

Well-Being: How You Doing?

Jennifer Rudloff

You probably hear it almost every day, and for folks that are pretty social, maybe many times during the day…

”How you doing?”

Most often, a “fine” or “great” satisfies, and the conversation moves on. Sometimes we might give a little more detail about some aches or a personal situation, but those are rare and usually superficial.

So how are we really doing? The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index can give us a snapshot or a trend line of the pulse of the nation or a subset, but how about on an individual basis? How often do we take the time to truly take stock of our own well-being?

While we generally have a good sense of our physical health, at least when symptoms are present, how conscious are we of our emotional and social health, areas that are core to our well-being?

Emotional health touches on areas most of us don’t often or ever consider: our self-awareness, taking time to be more mindful, being in touch with our feelings and sensing how they can guide or impact our behaviors. With our daily lives moving at a pace where it’s hard to keep up, it takes some effort to really pay attention and listen to the “beneath the surface” components that can be suppressed by our transactional days.

And in our interactions with others, whether colleagues, friends or family, the dimension of social health comes into play in how we choose to interface on an individual or group basis. What do you bring into each of these relationships, in those moments of interaction you share? How we initiate, communicate, respond and choose to agree and support or disagree and oppose help make up our social health. With whom we opt to invest our time and energy in relationships helps guide our well-being in positive or negative ways.

As a leader in well-being, we need to do more to promote our insights and ideas around social and emotional health, to provide deeper and more meaningful context about these elements of well-being so there can be greater understanding and appreciation of these areas.

As individuals, we can give ourselves a gift by making efforts to better know our own well-being, to make time to build better self-awareness, both for our own reflection and in interrelating with others.

So think about this, the next time someone says to you, “How you doing?”

Topics: Healthy Living Relationships Well-Being Workplace Well-Being Health Emotional Health Wellness Social Well-Being