The Well-Being Journal

Great Habits Make for Great Results!

Jennifer Rudloff

Woman eating healthyNow is the perfect time to reaffirm your commitment to your healthy diet and fitness goals.

Holiday festivities are just around the corner. This year, give yourself the gift of fitness! By planning ahead, you can avoid the weight gain, disappointment and (ever so common) Sprint & Fizzle of New Year's resolutions.

Sticking to an exercise & diet regime takes time, effort and commitment. Having support can make the difference between success and reverting back to old unhealthy habits. Finding a supportive friend, training partner, family member or online forum will go a long way towards helping you stay focused and motivated.

Staying fit is an ongoing lifestyle choice.

Here are some great suggestions that will lead to your success:

  • The simple act of READING about eating healthy and different ways to stay on track can make a big difference! You’ll subconsciously recall something you read and act upon even without realizing you are doing it.
  • The simple act of LOOKING at images that reflect your goals can make a big difference! Put a picture, article or motivational statement on your refrigerator door. Be sure it really inspires YOU. Look at it and think of what it means to you every time you think of opening the door or walk by.
  • Set realistic goals that can be met and maintained in the midst of day to day activities and responsibilities.
  • Let go of thinking in terms of ‘on’ or ‘off’ The Diet. Just be aware of what you eat & make good healthy, low calorie choices TODAY.
  • Limit portion size. 2 bowls taste the same as 2 bites. Pay attention to when you are ‘full’ and when you are eating it because it is there.
  • Limit soda and drink more water. Staying hydrated helps curb appetite.
  • Leave food on the stove. Fill your plate with less than you think you want and go sit down. You will be less likely to go back for more.
  • Balance your choices. Drop the ‘all or nothing’ thinking. If you treat yourself today, then make up for it by eating stricter and less calories tomorrow. Develop a healthy, guilt free relationship with food.
  • Don’t punish yourself or beat yourself up, but rather keep moving forward with your overall plan. The only way you will not get there is by standing still. Keep going!
  • Find ways to get exercise that you enjoy enough to do faithfully.
  • Do you 'stuff' your anger or eat to 'fill the void’ of boredom, loneliness or other emotions? Feel it, don’t eat it! Take action instead. Bored? Lonely? Go for a walk or call a friend.
  • Reward yourself! Every single day you are taking one step closer to your goal and practicing the habits that will help you maintain forever. Celebrate, acknowledge and enjoy!
  • Set yourself up to succeed! Maintain your desired weight and fitness level with an exercise and meal planning schedule that fits into your personal lifestyle.

By setting healthy lifestyle goals and reaching them, you will find joy, energy, self-confidence and new emotional coping tools that do not involve food.

Many people successfully attain and maintain their weight and fitness goals. You can, too!

Topics: Healthy Living Focus Exercise Motivation Social Well-Being Habits Diet

Does your company have a Chief Well-Being Officer?

Jennifer Rudloff

When people ask me about my job, the description is often met with surprise. Chief Well-Being Officer is not a common position in today’s C-Suite – and I think that’s a mistake. I can think back to a time not that long ago when the concept of a Chief Technology Officer was foreign; thought to be a “creative” title commissioned only by the Googles and Sun Microsystems of the world. Yet today, the absence of a CTO is almost unthinkable.

I challenge companies to think differently about the health of their employees, their most valuable asset. Research shows that employee well-being can play a key role in establishing a competitive business advantage. For instance, while 30 percent of a company’s healthcare spend is linked to medical care and pharmaceutical costs, the remaining 70 percent is spent on health-related costs associated with worker productivity (Spector, Bruce. The Cost of Absenteeism in the Workplace. Nov. 1, 2010. www.employersweb.com.). The research also demonstrates that companies with effective health and productivity programs generate more revenue per employee, attain a higher market value and generate higher shareholder returns.

The impact doesn’t just positively hit a company’s bottom line ... you must take into consideration the top-line benefits that coincide with a focus on well-being. Employers that focus on prevention, provide value-added benefits and demonstrate that they care about their employees’ physical and emotional needs are more likely to attract and retain top talent. They are also more likely to earn and maintain employee trust and foster a productive environment through a high performing, engaged workforce. Bottom line: these companies are more likely to succeed.

The job of a Chief Well-Being Officer is to focus on how employees can be impacted at work, at home and in the community and how this impact can improve the overall business performance.

At Healthways, we understand the importance and value of maintaining happy and healthy employees.

Yes, happy employees are good for business ... just ask the Chief Well-Being Officer.

Topics: Strategies and Comparative Advantage Business Performance Competitive Advantage Prevention Motivation How to Improve Employee Performance Employee Performance Improvement

Daniel Pink: Employee Engagement and Changing the World of Work

Jennifer Rudloff

Well-Being Summit participants heard best-selling author Daniel Pink speak on employee engagement and changing the world of work on Tuesday. Considering the decline in workplace well-being over the past few years, Pink talked about how workplace well-being can be improved through several key changes - the single greatest being motivation.

People spend half of their waking hours at work - disengaged. Because our well-being is formed while we are awake, our well-being at work is integral to our overall well-being. When people are disengaged, they're not motivated - and this leads to lower levels of workplace well-being.

Increasing, enlivening, and enriching the workplace improve the system of motivation within the workplace. By giving employees context for their work, room to grow within their own interests in the workplace, and allowances to move beyond the day-to-day work they conduct, well-being in the workplace will improve and overall well-being will too.

Topics: Well-Being Workplace Well-Being Employee Well-Being Health Well-Being Index Motivation wellbeing health wellbeing and health Health in the Workplace work motivation Events Employees Motivation No Motivation Lack of Motivation