The Well-Being Journal

Is Improving Your Financial Well-Being on Your List of New Year's Resolutions?

Sandy Cummings

blog SAD JAN 2012Sometimes you read something and think, "Yep, that about says it." Check out this article from TheStreet -- not a place where you'll usually catch me hanging out for a good read, but the title, "2014: The Year of Change," drew me in. Here's a little sample to pique your interest:

I don't know what it is, but something about the new year makes us want to reflect on our own imperfections. It makes us think. It forces us face to face with our regrets. It also makes us consider what we can do to make this year better than the last.

"We as humans love fresh beginnings and we get a new chance every January 1st," says Shannon Ryan, a certified financial planner who has worked with individuals and businesses for the last 20 years.

And there's nothing wrong with new year's resolutions, right? In theory, choosing to make one positive change each year could only be a good thing. Think about it. This year could be the year you start exercising. Next year you could focus on nutrition. The year after that could be the year when you finally stop overspending, once and for all.

Then, boom, you've evolved from an exercise-hating spendthrift to a CrossFit enthusiast who saves 90 percent of their income. And you did it all over the span of just a few years, right?

Wrong.

...

In order to move beyond resolutions, you have to make a lifestyle change. And that's exactly why people compare their financial challenges with their relationship with food. The similarities are striking. After all, it's easy to start a new diet on a Monday (don't all diets start on Monday?) and do awesome until about Thursday night when your husband breaks out a giant block of cheese at 10:00 p.m. (story of my life). Then, all of a sudden it's Friday and you're scarfing down nachos at Applebee's while secretly hating yourself. Oh, but you're totally going to restart the whole thing on Monday, right?

The article goes on to share Ryan's tips for getting your financial house in order, which I'm guessing is on the resolutions list for many of us.

Why is it so hard to make lifestyle changes that ultimately improve our overall well-being? Sometimes we just need a little help making the small steps that lead to big change. Healthways is working with the Dave Ramsey organization to make achieving financial well-being a little easier for everyone. It doesn't have to start on January 1 -- you can start any time. Stay tuned -- we'll be sharing more in the coming months.

 

Topics: Healthy Living Financial Well-Being Well-Being Links of the Week In the News Lifestyle Change New Years Resolution