The Well-Being Journal

Well-Being at Work, Healthways Style

Jennifer Rudloff

What would you think if you saw a co-worker walking to the printer sporting workout attire and wearing a camelback? At Healthways, it happens weekly. We encourage our colleagues to spend time during the day doing something to improve their well-being. In this video one of our colleagues talks about the culture at Healthways and how he gets involved.

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To learn more about some of the health and well-being initiatives we offer our colleagues, click here.

Topics: Healthy Living work Work Environment Workplace Well-Being Engagement Health Health in the Workplace Wellness Culture Wellness Program

Well-Being: How You Doing?

Jennifer Rudloff

You probably hear it almost every day, and for folks that are pretty social, maybe many times during the day…

”How you doing?”

Most often, a “fine” or “great” satisfies, and the conversation moves on. Sometimes we might give a little more detail about some aches or a personal situation, but those are rare and usually superficial.

So how are we really doing? The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index can give us a snapshot or a trend line of the pulse of the nation or a subset, but how about on an individual basis? How often do we take the time to truly take stock of our own well-being?

While we generally have a good sense of our physical health, at least when symptoms are present, how conscious are we of our emotional and social health, areas that are core to our well-being?

Emotional health touches on areas most of us don’t often or ever consider: our self-awareness, taking time to be more mindful, being in touch with our feelings and sensing how they can guide or impact our behaviors. With our daily lives moving at a pace where it’s hard to keep up, it takes some effort to really pay attention and listen to the “beneath the surface” components that can be suppressed by our transactional days.

And in our interactions with others, whether colleagues, friends or family, the dimension of social health comes into play in how we choose to interface on an individual or group basis. What do you bring into each of these relationships, in those moments of interaction you share? How we initiate, communicate, respond and choose to agree and support or disagree and oppose help make up our social health. With whom we opt to invest our time and energy in relationships helps guide our well-being in positive or negative ways.

As a leader in well-being, we need to do more to promote our insights and ideas around social and emotional health, to provide deeper and more meaningful context about these elements of well-being so there can be greater understanding and appreciation of these areas.

As individuals, we can give ourselves a gift by making efforts to better know our own well-being, to make time to build better self-awareness, both for our own reflection and in interrelating with others.

So think about this, the next time someone says to you, “How you doing?”

Topics: Healthy Living Relationships Well-Being Workplace Well-Being Health Emotional Health Wellness Social Well-Being

Hidden Factors Influencing Well-Being in the Workplace

Jennifer Rudloff

While everyone agrees a sick work environment is detrimental to your well-being, most people would have trouble articulating how, and how much. Interestingly, findings from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index® (WBI) and the Healthways Well-Being Assessment™ (WBA) are starting to bring more clarity about the work environment a person is experiencing. When we compare individual’s answers against their responses to other questions, we’re able to recognize the overall impact on well-being. Some of the factors are obvious, while others are subtler, or even hidden.

Let’s start with the more obvious. In more restrictive work environments workers are less likely to exercise and eat right. This is because leadership is less likely to establish a culture that is supportive of well-being. In this environment the building is less likely to be mindfully engineered to make the healthy choice the easy choice, and policies aren’t likely established to allow flexible time for exercise. As the result, employees will feel less support for work/life balance.

Unfortunately, much of the negative impact of the work environment on well-being is less obvious. Take Life Evaluation for example. We ask people to rate their current lives and how they think their lives will be in five years on a scale of one to ten. This allows us to gauge their level of optimism and hope. The group that scores the best, we call them “thrivers,” are generally more skewed toward lower risk, and have less chronic illness. We believe this is because they have their emotional and social houses in order, and thereby have more time, energy, and propensity to take good care of themselves.

Our data shows that the thrivers do better on 16 different social and emotional variables, or perhaps said in reverse, doing well on these variables is what allows them to “thrive.” Of the 16 variables, 7 are impacted by a person’s experience in the work setting. These include: job satisfaction, job overload, co-worker issues, technology, supervisor issues, training, and resources. If the work culture does not support workers in these areas there will be a social and emotional impact that reduces the chances they will take care of themselves. This results in more risk factors and higher disease prevalence, which adds to health-related costs and leads to deterioration in their work performance. Thrivers have less activity impairment, less productivity loss, and higher presenteeism than their workforce peers.

We have information on many other factors too. Here are a few highlights:

  • People who report poor work environments are more likely to have a high BMI. In fact, poor work environment has almost as high a correlation to BMI as does low physical activity and poor eating habits. In this sense, an aggravating boss can make you fat, because it causes stress, which can distract you from taking action on a healthy lifestyle.
  • 31 percent of people who report being in a poor work environment also report being angry “a majority of yesterday.” To put this in perspective, that level of anger is on par with the poorest 100 hundred counties in the US, as well as the troubled countries of Sierra Leone and Haiti. Anger is one of those emotional factors that keep people from living a healthy lifestyle. Can you imagine trying to establish an effective worksite health management program in an environment where over 30 percent of the people are angry on any given day?
  • There is a negatively compounding link between poor work environment and chronic illness. People with one to three chronic illnesses who report a poor work environment, also report having 6.6 more days a year of activity impairment than their counterparts in a positive work environment. That number increases to 16.2 days for those with four or more chronic illnesses. (Note: About 54 percent of the workforce has at least one chronic illness.)
  • Even commuting to work has risk! Statistics show that for every 15 minutes more people commute their anger and stress goes up, their rest and exercise goes down, their eating behaviors worsen, and they become more over-weight.

There are many interesting findings on how work environment affects well-being, these are only a few. Is there anything you can add, even if it is just observational? What would you do about it at your worksite? I look forward to you responses.

Topics: Healthy Living work Work Environment Workplace Well-Being Health Well-Being Index Health in the Workplace Wellness Culture Wellness Program Leadership Occupational Health

Healthways Garden: Planting Seeds for Well-Being

Jennifer Rudloff

After spending months talking and dreaming of putting together an edible garden at Healthways Headquarters we finally pulled the trigger. In February we gathered landscapers and gardeners together with colleagues from our facilities department, our property management company, and the onsite café to talk about what we wanted out of the garden. (I am Wendi Micheletto, Healthways colleague and Davidson County Master Gardener.)

Once the landscaper came up with a design for the garden, we took it to the property owner for her sign off. Once we got her approval it didn’t take us very long to get excited about the garden! In early May, the landscape team cut out the garden and created a border out of heavy pavers. Knowing that everyone doesn’t have the space to create his or her own in ground garden at home, we wanted to provide another option. To show colleagues what they can grow in a container, we added a large pot to our courtyard for vegetables. In Mid-May I went with our Chef and another colleague to area stores and nursery’s to pick out plants. We choose a wide variety of herbs and a few summer vegetables. Shortly after purchasing the plants, we announced to the building we were planting and invited colleagues to come out and help. We had a few colleagues come and help us get everything in the ground. Though to be honest, with the hot summer sun and steamy Tennessee weather it has been a bit of a challenge to get help, though I expect this will change for our fall season. Once the plants were in the ground we mulched in an effort to avoid the weeds and keep in the moisture. (As an aside, it took us a few weeks to get the mulch in the garden, and during that time it got very weedy).

Then came the maintenance. Since colleagues are encouraged to wear workout attire and do something active on Wednesdays (dubbed "Workout Wednesdays"), we scheduled time in the garden every Wednesday morning. It’s nice to begin the day with fresh air and good company and seeing what has happened throughout the week with both our plant and people friends. While we work, it gives us a chance to chat about what’s going both personally and professionally, providing ample opportunities to build community and increase collaboration.

It has been a very good season for our inaugural garden. Though we grew mostly herbs along side just a few vegetable, we have harvested and delivered more than 210lbs of produce that our chef has been able to use daily in meals prepared in the café. While there are only a couple ‘regulars’ at the weekly weeding and harvesting, there are others that drop in when they have time. Even some of our remote colleagues from out of town have dropped in to help while in town.

Since we’re based in the south, we are able to have three full garden seasons. We’re beginning to plan for the fall season, some greens, beets and turnips perhaps. We also plan on doing some additional outreach to colleagues and offering some of those brown thumbed folks some classes so they can begin to reap the benefits gardening has to offer. In months to come, we hope to get a commitment from each department to adopt and care for the garden for a month. It’s a great way to plant the seeds of teamwork, see the rewards, be active, and build a tighter sense of community between colleagues.

Topics: Healthy Living Well-Being Workplace Well-Being Engagement Health Community Healthways Garden