The Well-Being Journal

New Research Reveals State Rankings of Well-Being Nationwide

Cameron Bowman

Emphasis on well-being by community leaders, government, employers and other population health stakeholders has never been more prominent. Well-being captures how people feel about and experience their daily lives. It is directly correlated with important business and community metrics, such as healthcare utilization and cost, and productivity measures such as absenteeism and job performance. It is an effective gauge to assess and acknowledge environments where people can live their best lives and do their best work.

With the release of a new report from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®, you can gain new insight into the state of well-being across the nation.

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The report, “State of American Well-Being: 2015 State Rankings”, provides an overview of well-being trends within the United States. As in prior years, well-being in the U.S. exhibits regional patterns. The northern plains and mountain west are higher well-being areas, along with some western states and pockets of the northeast and Atlantic.  The lowest well-being states are in the south and move north through the industrial Midwest.

Hawaii reclaimed the top well-being spot among all states in the U.S. with Alaska, 2014’s top state, claiming the second spot. Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, Utah, Arizona and California rounded out the rest of the top 10. Kentucky and West Virginia continued to have the lowest well-being in the nation, ranking 49th and 50th, respectively, and have so for the past seven straight years.

To discover where other states — including yours — fall within the rankings, download a copy of the report today. You can also subscribe to content from the Well-Being Index. By subscribing, we’ll let you know when we release new research and insights from the Well-Being Index.

The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index uses a holistic definition of well-being and collects self-reported data from individuals across the globe to create a unique view of societies’ progress on the elements that matter most to well-being: purpose, social, financial, community and physical. It is the most proven, mature and comprehensive measure of well-being in populations.

Topics: Well-Being Index State Rankings

Well-being vs. the Traditional HRA: Who Wins?

Cameron Bowman

A productive workforce is a profitable workforce. Whether through management initiatives, outside consulting or wellness programs, employers are increasingly invested in understanding, quantifying, and ultimately improving productivity. The multi-billion dollar wellness industry claims to be able to achieve all three objectives, through identifying and mitigating health risks that may negatively impact productivity. However, while the venerable health risk assessment (HRA) remains a staple in the majority of workplace wellness programs, new research suggests that it may not be the most effective measure to guide efforts aimed at improving productivity.

Since the traditional HRA focuses almost exclusively on physical risk, many barriers to high individual performance, such as financial troubles and a disengaged work life, may be overlooked. By contrast, taking into account an individual’s well-being – which includes factors like emotional health, healthy behaviors, work environment, basic access to care, community quality and safety, and life evaluation in addition to physical health – gives a much more accurate picture of both current and future productivity levels. A new study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, verifies the distinct advantage of individual well-being measurement over an HRA in predicting changes in employee productivity over a two-year period.

The study found that change in well-being was the most significant independent predictor of productivity change across three measures: self-reported job performance, self-reported on-the-job productivity loss, and employer-reported unscheduled PTO use. The well-being assessment performed four times better than the HRA in explaining variances in job performance and nearly three times better for presenteeism. Even after removing the physical health aspects (physical health and healthy behavior domains) of the well-being score – aspects on which HRAs typically focus – well-being maintained its advantage over the HRA, confirming the importance of non-physical factors to workplace productivity.

With the amount of money spent on workplace wellness continuing to rise, investing in the correct tool to identify the factors that most affect productivity change over time can maximize not only your employee performance and well-being, but your bottom line.

To read more about the study, click here.

Topics: Well-Being Well-being Assessment

Quantifying Well-Being: A Big Idea for 2016

Cameron Bowman

In his contribution to LinkedIn’s #BigIdeas2016 series, Deepak Chopra, world renowned author and speaker, shared his view on the increased importance of well-being transparency and assessment as we move further into an age where health can be quantified and bolstered by technology.

For some, well-being may be an ambiguous concept that holds little importance to the material world. However, through research conducted by Gallup and Healthways, well-being is no longer a misunderstood idea nor an intangible notion - it can be definitively measured and interpreted.

Since 2008, Gallup and Healthways have partnered to understand the well-being of both individuals and populations. Together, we measure and study well-being so we can act efficiently and effectively to improve it. We have made it easier for business leaders and government officials to make informed decisions by helping them understand and quantify well-being through two key initiatives.

The first, a scientific survey instrument and reporting experience called the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being 5™, is used to give each participant a “single number that informs you of your total state of wellbeing,” as Dr. Chopra says of the ideal quantification, “evaluating not just the body's vital signs but the mind-body connection as well.” It measures the five interrelated elements that research has shown to have the greatest impact on an individual’s well-being: purpose, social, financial, community and physical. Insights gained through this assessment help individuals take the first steps on their journey to living better.

Our second initiative, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®, takes the concept of quantifying well-being at an individual level and expands it to include communities, states and nations. The Gallup-Healthways Global Well-Being Index uses self-reported data from individuals across the planet to create a unique view of global states of mind and societies’ progress on the elements that matter most to well-being. Globally, higher well-being has been associated with outcomes indicative of stability and resilience — for example, healthcare utilization, intent to migrate, trust in elections and local institutions, lowered daily stress, food/shelter security, volunteerism, and willingness to help others. Understanding these relationships allows world leaders insight into their populations that might not be otherwise transparent.

In his post, Dr. Chopra states “in short, wellness is about to become much more transparent as technology quantifies all the factors that contribute to wellbeing.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Topics: Well-Being Index Gallup

New Study Links Purpose to Lower Risk of Death & Disease

Cameron Bowman

Do you have a firm sense of purpose for your life? If not, you aren’t alone. Based on data measured by the Gallup-Healthways Global Well-Being Index, only 18% of the world’s population has a thriving sense of purpose, which includes liking what you do each day and being motivated to achieve your goals. Direction and purpose can help you lead a fulfilled existence but new research also suggests that a sense of purpose can have a positive impact on your long-term health.

According to a new report published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society, those with a higher sense of purpose in life are at lower risk of death and cardiovascular disease. The report analyzed and aggregated data from ten peer-reviewed studies to find association between a measurement of purpose in life and mortality and/or cardiovascular episodes. The analysis found a substantive correlation between a higher sense of life purpose and a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, even when adjusted for additional factors. It also found that a high sense of purpose resulted in a significantly lower overall risk of death.

For our national population and economy, this information is especially relevant. Those with a firm sense of purpose in their lives tend to be highly engaged in their work. They are invested in what they do and focus on maximizing the value of their efforts. When people are unable to find fulfillment or achieve personal success and well-being with respect to their purpose, it can impact areas beyond the individual, including society as a whole.

Notably, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index ranks the United States only 22nd in the world in terms of purpose well-being. Addressing the profound lack of purpose not only within the workplace but in our communities is of strategic concern for government leaders, health plans and providers, employers, and educators.

To see what communities nationwide are doing to promote purpose and greater well-being, click here.

To learn more about how you can create a culture of purpose and well-being within your organization, click here.

Topics: Purpose Well-Being